Tagged: Wikipedia

Cosrin: A New Dawn

Today I tried out another roleplaying enforced, fantasy themed MUD, much like the MUD I wrote about yesterday.  I made Greri, a human fighter on Cosrin: A New Dawn.   Character creation was short and simple on this MUD, which is something I usually prefer.  The faster I can jump in and start playing, the better.

I opted to go through the new player training on this MUD, as I usually do when trying out a new MUD, and boy am I ever glad I did.  Most of the MUDs I play are based on derivatives of the Diku codebase, and have similar commands.  This MUD uses a custom codebase, and things didn’t exactly work the way I expected them to.  This was a bit off-putting at first, but by the time I finished the  tutorial areas, I actually began to like some of the differences, such as actually having to type to advance on my opponent before attacking with a melee weapon, and entering an attack command every round, instead of having combat be pretty much automatic like on many diku style MUDs.  You can also mix two items to create new items, which is a neat feature.

The hardest thing to get used to was having to hold items in my hands before I could use or wear them, instead of being able to use them directly out of my inventory like I am used to.  I am still undecided as to whether this adds depth to the game, or is just annoying.  It is something I can see being a big barrier to less MUD savvy players.

This MUD is also pay to play if you want to advance past level 30.  I don’t have an opinion one way or the other about pay to play MUDs, but I will rarely try one that isn’t at least playable for non paying players.

All in all, I had a good time on this MUD today, and will probably log back in sometime soon.

Advertisements

My Letter From Wikimedia

Image representing Wikimedia Foundation as dep...

Image via CrunchBase

I just wanted to share this nice email I got from the folks at Wikimedia.  I am not doing this to show off.  My donation was very small.  My intention in sharing this is to hopefully make some other people aware of this cause.  Wikipedia and it’s sister sites are an invaluable resource I use every day, and have become an essential part of my life.  These sites are provide to us free of charge, and they need our support.

Dear J.S Wilson,

Thank you for donating to the Wikimedia Foundation. You are wonderful!

It’s easy to ignore our fundraising banners, and I’m really glad you didn’t. This is how Wikipedia pays its bills — people like you giving us money, so we can keep the site freely available for everyone around the world.

People tell me they donate to Wikipedia because they find it useful, and they trust it because even though it’s not perfect, they know it’s written for them. Wikipedia isn’t meant to advance somebody’s PR agenda or push a particular ideology, or to persuade you to believe something that’s not true. We aim to tell the truth, and we can do that because of you. The fact that you fund the site keeps us independent and able to deliver what you need and want from Wikipedia. Exactly as it should be.

You should know: your donation isn’t just covering your own costs. The average donor is paying for his or her own use of Wikipedia, plus the costs of hundreds of other people. Your donation keeps Wikipedia available for an ambitious kid in Bangalore who’s teaching herself computer programming. A middle-aged homemaker in Vienna who’s just been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. A novelist researching 1850s Britain. A 10-year-old in San Salvador who’s just discovered Carl Sagan.

On behalf of those people, and the half-billion other readers of Wikipedia and its sister sites and projects, I thank you for joining us in our effort to make the sum of all human knowledge available for everyone. Your donation makes the world a better place. Thank you.

Most people don’t know Wikipedia’s run by a non-profit. Please consider sharing this e-mail with a few of your friends to encourage them to donate too. And if you’re interested, you should try adding some new information to Wikipedia. If you see a typo or other small mistake, please fix it, and if you find something missing, please add it. There are resources here that can help you get started. Don’t worry about making a mistake: that’s normal when people first start editing and if it happens, other Wikipedians will be happy to fix it for you.

I appreciate your trust in us, and I promise you we’ll use your money well.

Thanks,
Sue

Sue Gardner
Executive Director,
Wikimedia Foundation

Sword & Pen MUD Launches This Week

Swords from the Tenth to the Thirteenth Centuries

Swords from the Tenth to the Thirteenth Centuries (Photo credit: One lucky guy)

Today I am pleased to announce the official launch of the Sword & Pen MUD.  This MUD is based on the coffeeMUD codebase, and features classic areas that should be familiar to players of ROM based MUDs.  The Sword & Pen MUD will serve as a fun social hangout for readers of the Sword & Pen blog, and anyone else who wants to stop by.

For those of you that want to try your hand at building, either through OLC, or with CoffeeMUD’s powerful and easy to use browser based building environment, Sword & Pen offers you the opportunity to experiment with building your own areas and quests.  I will be putting builder applications online shortly.

Keep a lookout for the new Sword & Pen MUD page that I will be adding to this blog, which will contain information on how to connect to the Sword & Pen MUD, and how to sign up for a builder account.  I look forward to hanging out with my fellow MUDers and meeting new friends on Sword & Pen  MUD, as we create worlds and go on epic adventures together.  This may be starting out as a simple, stock coffeeMUD, but I hope this project will evolve into much more!

Planning

Combat was simple turn-based point and click f...

Combat was simple turn-based point and click fare, typical of many graphical RPG’s of its time. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Why do I always ignore good advice?  Since I started working on my MUD, I have read in every MUD forum and every piece of codebase documentation I have ever looked at about planning out areas on graph paper before I actually start building them, and yet, I have studiously ignored this advice, because I am always so impatient when it comes to building MUD areas.  Unfortunately, I am now starting to see that I have a much harder time building my areas without a written plan.  So tonight I am assigning myself a homework assignment.  Tonight, I am going to sit down at my desk with my notebook, and my pencil, and draw a map of my new area Sea Meadows.

I originally was going to give Sea Meadows a small village feel, but now I am leaning more towards making it a small city.  It needs to include some kind of central square, which will serve as the primary recall room for this MUD, as well as a variety of shops and guilds.  It should also have at least a couple of quests geared towards low level groups.

I don’t want to get too hung up on all the minutia of this area just yet.  Fussing over all the details tends to derail me from the bigger picture, and hinder me from making progress.  For now, my job is just to come up with a least of a bare minimum of rooms this area will need, and then start putting those rooms on a map.